Academic and Professional Portfolio

Posts tagged “archaeology

Archaeology

Archeology is not my specialty, but I have always been drawn to the discipline.  I am comfortable cataloguing  collections and curating artifacts. I have done  limited fieldwork as a crew member or volunteer at the direction of experienced archaeologists. I am not afraid to get dirty. I have the ability to read field maps and complete  field documentation and site maps.  I have a particular interest in NAGPRA repatriation.

Field

2010. Presidio Nuestra Señora del Pilar de los Adaes (16NA16). I coordinated volunteers doing wet screening, bagging and labeling of artifacts.

1998. Public Archeaology in the Treme (16OR148). I participated with excavation and dry screening.

Lab & Curation

2010.  Graduate Assistant, Williamson Museum under direction of Hiram F. “Pete” Gregory. Curating and inventory of  Williamson Museum’s permanent collections.

1999. Student summer curator for the Greater New Orleans Archaeology Program under guidance of Christopher N. Matthews. Sorting, labeling, photographing artifacs and assisting with editing archaeological reports.

Theory and Additional Skills

In Fall 2009 I  had a refresher on mapping, shovel testing, grid graphing, and the use of geophysical testing and GPS systems with Dr. Tommy Haley at Ft. Jesup archaeological site as part of his methods course. Also as part of this course I completed an archaeological proposal, “Rediscovering Willow Plantation” based on archival research and lidar maps.

Interpretation of Archaeological Reports

I am comfortable reading archaeological reports and integrating  archaeological data into my research projects.

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Rediscovering old connections: Nacogdoches, Tx

A Summer 2010 trip to Nacogdoches to do research on descendants of Los Adaes brought me to the East Texas Research Center where I met with Peggy Jasso, a Texas genealogist specializing in old Spanish and mestizo families.I searched land records and poured through old Spanish documents translated in the E.B. Blake Collection.

 

I visited  rural communities and a number the older cemeteries.  In the course of visiting these communities with Dr. George Avery, an archaeologist at Stephen F. Austin University, we had the pleasure of meeting good contacts for follow up ethnographic fieldwork regarding life along the old  El Camino Real. Dr. Avery introduced me to the pre-historic and historic archaeology of the area. Before returning home, I  saw Old Stone Fort, Mission Delores and stopped for inspiration at  El Lobanillo, the site of Gil Ybarbo’s ranch on the Texas side of the Sabine River.