Academic and Professional Portfolio

skills

Museums and Sites Interpretation

Los Adaes

Los Adaes was the capital of Spanish Tejas on the northeastern frontier of New Spain from 1729 to 1770. It included a mission, San Miguel de Linares de los Adaes, and a presidio, Nuestra Señora del Pilar de Los Adaes.

As part of a previous summer internship with the Cane River National Heritage Area, I performed personal on-site interpretation at the visitors center and on the grounds of this National Historic Landmark site. I am in the process of creating a web portal to consolidate existing electronic resources on Los Adaes.

Above, right: extemporaneous interpretation at Los Adaes visitors center during geophysical investigations, Summer 2010

Williamson Museum

The Williamson Museum, located on Northwestern State University campus, includes a large collection of colonial and prehistoric pottery from northern and central Louisiana. Most notably, the museum houses the artifact collection for the Los Adaes archaeological site and the Clarence H. Webb collection of  prehistoric Caddoan archaeological sequence in Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. It is also a state and federal repository for archaeological collections for the region. The ethnological collection efforts have concentrated on baskets and other crafts of the southeastern tribes.

I currently serve as docent under the direction of Hiram F. “Pete” Gregory on an as-needed basis. In addition to welcoming visitors, I participate in interpretive planning and exhibition development, cataloging  collections and curating artifacts.

New Orleans Neighborhoods

As a former resident of the Bywater, Marigny, and Mid City communities, and a student at the University of New Orleans,  I am familiar with the history and geomorphology of the Greater New Orleans Region. I have led numerous informal walking tours to all downtown neighborhoods and cemeteries using the Preservation Resource Center’s neighborhood brochures:

French Quarter

Faubourg Tremé

Faubourg Marigny

Bywater

St. Roch

New Marigny

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Ethnography & Oral History

My project-thesis “Choctaw-Apache Foodways” depends on ethnographic fieldwork and oral history among the Choctaw-Apache of Ebarb community.

Gourds drying

Pepper Soup and Biscuits

Mr. Dick Sepulvado making tamales

I have written short, unpublished ethnographic papers on the following:

– Czech Cowboy culture

-Archaeologists and their relationship to the descendants of the people they study

-Native born American Buddhists

-Islamophobia in France, U.K., and Germany: What about the Czech Republic?

-French Market of New Orleans: A case of Continuity or Adaptive Reuse?

-Theravada Buddhism and Ethnic Identity in Texas

My hope is to continue researching the intersections of food and culture. I plan on writing a short article on the Zwolle Tamale Fiesta and ethnic identity in Sabine Parish. I have a research plan on a book on the relationship between grits and culture in the U.S. South, tentatively entitled, “How d’ you take your grits?”

I follow the ethical standards of the American Anthropology Association requiring informed consent, and the practices embodied in the Principles and Best Practices of the Oral History Association and the follow University requirements for Oral History under Human Subjects Institutional Review Board.


Archaeology

Archeology is not my specialty, but I have always been drawn to the discipline.  I am comfortable cataloguing  collections and curating artifacts. I have done  limited fieldwork as a crew member or volunteer at the direction of experienced archaeologists. I am not afraid to get dirty. I have the ability to read field maps and complete  field documentation and site maps.  I have a particular interest in NAGPRA repatriation.

Field

2010. Presidio Nuestra Señora del Pilar de los Adaes (16NA16). I coordinated volunteers doing wet screening, bagging and labeling of artifacts.

1998. Public Archeaology in the Treme (16OR148). I participated with excavation and dry screening.

Lab & Curation

2010.  Graduate Assistant, Williamson Museum under direction of Hiram F. “Pete” Gregory. Curating and inventory of  Williamson Museum’s permanent collections.

1999. Student summer curator for the Greater New Orleans Archaeology Program under guidance of Christopher N. Matthews. Sorting, labeling, photographing artifacs and assisting with editing archaeological reports.

Theory and Additional Skills

In Fall 2009 I  had a refresher on mapping, shovel testing, grid graphing, and the use of geophysical testing and GPS systems with Dr. Tommy Haley at Ft. Jesup archaeological site as part of his methods course. Also as part of this course I completed an archaeological proposal, “Rediscovering Willow Plantation” based on archival research and lidar maps.

Interpretation of Archaeological Reports

I am comfortable reading archaeological reports and integrating  archaeological data into my research projects.



Rediscovering old connections: Nacogdoches, Tx

A Summer 2010 trip to Nacogdoches to do research on descendants of Los Adaes brought me to the East Texas Research Center where I met with Peggy Jasso, a Texas genealogist specializing in old Spanish and mestizo families.I searched land records and poured through old Spanish documents translated in the E.B. Blake Collection.

 

I visited  rural communities and a number the older cemeteries.  In the course of visiting these communities with Dr. George Avery, an archaeologist at Stephen F. Austin University, we had the pleasure of meeting good contacts for follow up ethnographic fieldwork regarding life along the old  El Camino Real. Dr. Avery introduced me to the pre-historic and historic archaeology of the area. Before returning home, I  saw Old Stone Fort, Mission Delores and stopped for inspiration at  El Lobanillo, the site of Gil Ybarbo’s ranch on the Texas side of the Sabine River.

 


Documentation and Preservation

Historic American Buildings Survey

I completed a detailed Level IV  HABS report on 550-560 Front Street (DeBlieux) Commerical Building in Natchitoches. The report has been submitted to the Library of Congress.

Cemetery Preservation

I practice proper Cemetery care and grave marker cleaning methods. I learned these skills from Dr. Elizabeth Guin and put them to the test at American Cemetery in Natchitoches, LA. I also participated in the Oakland Cemetery tornado damage documentation for FEMA Assessment. November 2009.

After cleaning

Digitization

I completed the Historic Landmark District Survey Digitization Project for the Cane River National Heritage Area and City of Natchitoches planning office in early summer 2010.

I have the ability to digitize  and convert various forms of media, including:

* VHS to DVD

* Analog Cassette to digital audio file

* Paper to .pdf

* Photo, photo negative, or slide to .jpg

 


Texas & Pacific Railroad Research

 

In Fall 2009, I conducted background research regarding Natchitoches’ 1927 Texas and Pacific Railroad Depot.

Photo: Jack Boucher, Library of Congress, Prints and Photograph Division HABS: LA-1296-2

The Depot represents the shift from riverboat transportation to rail and the hegemony of Natchitoches’ town elite over downriver Creole planters and more rural Anglo settlers. Initially the Texas & Pacific line circumvented Natchitoches. Instead of allowing Prudhomme (Cypress, LA,) Marthaville, or Robeline to become the premier main rail hub in the Parish, Natchitoches businessmen created a new joint stock company to build a “tap line”  to bring rail access to the town. The Texas & Pacific Railway constructed the two-storied brick depot after securing that “tap line” and integrating Natchitoches as part of their main line.

The depot’s architect , F. G. Shaw, drew on Spanish and colonial themes, reportedly to honor Natchitoches founder St. Denis’s Spanish wife. The beams and windows of the main waiting room are influenced by the architect’s imagination of the master’s cabin of Christopher Columbus the Santa Mari and the chandeliers were modeled after the hilt of the sword worn by St. Denis.

Natchitoches’ Jim Crow segregation is evident in the building’s design. The large central hall was the white waiting area. One, smaller, side wing was the black waiting area, while  the other side was used for freight. Once restored, the  building is ideal for an  African American and/or Civil Rights museum.

Research on the history and context of the Texas and Pacific Railroad brought me to Dallas/ Fort Worth. En route I visited the restored 1912 T&P station in Marshall, TX (still in use as an Amtrak station) and the restored 1912 era T&P Depot (Amtrak Station) and Texas and Pacific Railway Museum.  I did archival research at SMU’s DeGoyer Library and visited U.T. Arlington. I rode the Trinity Railway from downtown Dallas to the magnificent 1931 T&P station where I photo documented the building’s architecture.